Where Is The Ever Encroaching Surveillance Leading To? (‘Shadow Government’ Documentary, 2009)

Where Is The Ever Encroaching Surveillance Leading To? (‘Shadow Government’ Documentary, 2009)

Ever wonder why our government sent out census workers to take the GPS coordinates of every single house in America?  I wondered at the time until the news broke about drones being used inside the borders of the United States…do the math.

Let’s start here with Verizon’s patent for a DVR box that has a microphone and sensors inside it to watch you inside the privacy of your own home in order to ‘target advertising’.

(more…)

Big Brother Doesn’t Want It’s Revenue Streams Endangering Themselves

Big Brother Doesn’t Want It’s Revenue Streams Endangering Themselves

Common sense dictates that if somebody falls in the water from your rafting service, you jump in and rescue that person. Taken from the viewpoint of a collectivist government that looks upon it’s citizens as property and revenue streams, doing something like that is punishable because a revenue stream is not permitted to make decisions that endanger it’s ability to keep pouring money into the federal coffers.

Sound farfetched?

Given the following story of a 13 year old girl falling out of a river raft and the guide’s successful rescue and then arrest because of said rescue, which scenario seems more likely? (Hint: wake up people…unsustainable debt…96% debt to GDP…government has well over 51% of the private economy now, etc.)

Raft guide arrested after helping stranded rafter on Clear Creek

Clear Creek sheriff’s deputies on Thursday arrested a rafting guide for swimming to a stranded young rafter who had tumbled from his boat on Clear Creek.

Ryan Daniel Snodgrass, a 28-year-old guide with Arkansas Valley Adventures rafting company, was charged with “obstructing government operations,” said Clear Creek Sheriff Don Krueger.

“He was told not to go in the water, and he jumped in and swam over to the victim and jeopardized the rescue operation,” said Krueger, noting that his office was deciding whether to file similar charges against another guide who was at the scene just downstream of Kermitts Roadhouse on U.S. 6.

Duke Bradford, owner of Arkansas Valley Adventures, said Snodgrass did the right thing by contacting the 13-year-old Texas girl immediately and not waiting for the county’s search and rescue team to assemble ropes, rafts and rescuers.

“When you have someone in sight who has taken a long swim, you need to make contact immediately,” said Bradford, a 15-year rafting guide and ski patroller from Summit County. “This is just silly. Ryan Snodgrass acted entirely appropriately. These guys came to the scene late and there was a rescue in progress. They came in and took over an existing rescue. To leave a patient on the side of a river while you get your gear out of the car and set up a rescue system you read about in a book is simply not good policy.”

Snodgrass’ raft flipped on the runoff-swelled Clear Creek around noon Thursday and the girl swam from the raft. Krueger said the girl was missing for 30 to 45 minutes while Snodgrass searched for her. He said she swam a half mile from the spot where the raft capsized.

Since it had been so long, Krueger said, it was no longer the rafting company’s rescue.

“They should involve themselves up to a point. They lost contact. Whether they want to say they were trying to rescue their customer, when they had lost visual contact and had no idea where their customer has been for 30 to 45 minutes, then it becomes our issue.”

Bradford said he would expect his guides to do the same thing again. His guides are professionals, he said, trained and certified in swiftwater rescue.

“To jump into water and navigate a river in a swiftwater rescue is common. You get into the river and swim. You have to do it,” Branford said. “The fact these guys don’t understand that is disturbing. Making contact immediately with your victim is essential. It’s not about who is in charge. It’s about the safety of a 13-year-old girl. You are going to do everything in your power to insure the safety of your guest, and if that means in Idaho Springs you get arrested, well I guess we’ll just get arrested.”

Ryan and Dale are true Americans that appear to be getting their first taste of the paradigm shift that has occurred since the Federal Reserve and Social Security were installed to keep track of the slaves.

FBI Is Knocking On Doors Of Activists

Watch this, and read the story of this Austin mom at this link.

From PrisonPlanet.com

In the video below, agents of friendly fascism — who resemble a insurance salesman and his dowdy wife — visit a woman in Austin, Texas, and attempt to ask a few friendly questions about her rebellious behavior during a pro-Palestinian demonstration. Her rebellion did not consist of bomb-making or even inappropriate jokes about the president. Her crime was to display organized outrage over the murder and mistreatment of an entire people, a crime supported by and paid for by the U.S. government.

The FBI agents asked: Did she know anybody who would engage in violence or property damage? In other words, does she admit to being a terrorist and does she know of any terrorist plots ongoing?

At first glance, this line of questioning seems patently absurd. But it has a deeper purpose unstated and denied by the FBI — to inculcate fear of the state and intimidate and modify the behavior of an unruly and rebellious child. It is a routine designed to shut down opposition and discourage troublemakers from exercising their First Amendment right to petition the government for redress of grievances.

(Editor’s note: Though I do not agree with this woman’s views, it is her right to protest and exercise her right to free speech without Big Brother coming to her door.)

‘Big Brother’ Cybersecurity Law Clears First Hurdle

‘Big Brother’ Cybersecurity Law Clears First Hurdle

March 20th, 2009:

Almost a full year ago, Jay Rockefeller stating that the internet should never have been created.

On 2.4.2010, just days ago, the house companion bill, H.R. 4061: Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2009 passed, clearing the first hurdle to allow the White House total control over the internet with Jay Rockefeller’s S773 and S778.  Go here for all the necessary information on the elistists’ bills, and/or hit the related links at the bottom of this post.

InfoWars has an excellent take on the passage of House bill 4061, (emphasis mine):

Following the Halloweenesque scare fest on Capitol Hill earlier this week — where National Intelligence director Dennis Blair and CIA director Leon Panetta warned of impending terrorist doom — the has House has The Cybersecurity Enhancement Act (H.R. 4061).

“The House today overwhelmingly passed a bill aimed at building up the United States’ cybersecurity army and expertise, amid growing alarm over the country’s vulnerability online,” reports the New York Times. “The bill, which passed 422-5, requires the Obama administration to conduct an agency-by-agency assessment of cybersecurity workforce skills and establishes a scholarship program for undergraduate and graduate students who agree to work as cybersecurity specialists for the government after graduation.”

As a side note, where are those scholarships for all the health care professionals that are going to be required to replace the doctors that quit, and take care of those extra 30-35 million people?  That has been my biggest beef since the very beginning of this health care romp.  How does one insure 30 million more people and provide them with the same level of care with only 856,000 doctors?  But I digress…

Now, the next biggest installment in the loss of our liberty after the Patriot Act.  If you want to continue to have a means of communicating other than carrier pigeon, better get on down to your local representatives’ office and let them know what you think.  Forget emailing or calling; it is much harder to ignore you when you are standing in their doorway, (and that is what it is going to take).

Cybersecurity bill to give president new emergency powers

The president would have the power to safeguard essential federal and private Web resources under draft Senate cybersecurity legislation.

According to an aide familiar with the proposal, the bill includes a mandate for federal agencies to prepare emergency response plans in the event of a massive, nationwide cyberattack.

The president would then have the ability to initiate those network contingency plans to ensure key federal or private services did not go offline during a cyberattack of unprecedented scope, the aide said.

Ultimately, the legislation is chiefly the brainchild of Sens. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) and Olympia Snowe (R-Maine), the chairman and ranking member of the Senate Commerce Committee, respectively. Both lawmakers have long clamored for a federal cybersecurity bill, charging that current measures — including the legislation passed by the House last year — are too piecemeal to protect the country’s Web infrastructure.

Their renewed focus arrives on the heels of two, high-profile cyberattacks last month: A strike on Google, believed to have originated in China, and a separate, more disjointed attack that affected thousands of businesses worldwide.

Rockefeller and Snowe’s forthcoming bill would establish a host of heretofore absent cybersecurity prevention and response measures, an aide close to the process said. The bill will “significantly [raise] the profile of cybersecurity within the federal government,” while incentivizing private companies to do the same, according to the aide.

Additionally, it will “promote public awareness” of Internet security issues, while outlining key protections of Americans’ civil liberties on the Web, the aide continued.

Privacy groups are nonetheless likely to take some umbrage at Rockefeller and Snowe’s latest effort, an early draft of which leaked late last year.

When early reports predicted the cybersecurity measure would allow the president to “declare a cybersecurity emergency,” online privacy groups said they felt that would endow the White House with overly ambiguous and far-reaching powers to regulate the Internet.

The bill will still contain most of those powers, and a “vast majority” of its other components “remain unchanged,” an aide with knowledge of the legislation told The Hill. But both the aide and a handful of tech insiders who support the bill have nonetheless tried to dampen skeptics’ concerns, reminding them the president already has vast — albeit lesser-known — powers to regulate the Internet during emergencies.

It is unclear when Rockefeller and Snowe will finish their legislation. And the ongoing debate over healthcare reform, financial regulatory reform, jobs bills and education fixes could postpone action on the floor for many months.

Both lawmakers heavily emphasized the need for such a bill during a Senate Commerce Committee cybersecurity hearing on Wednesday.

“Too much is at stake for us to pretend that today’s outdated cybersecurity policies are up to the task of protecting our nation and economic infrastructure,” Rockefeller said. “We have to do better and that means it will take a level of coordination and sophistication to outmatch our adversaries and minimize this enormous threat.”

So fellow Patriots, how do you feel about losing your money, your land, your food, your guns, your means of communication, and YOUR CONSTITUTION?

Today’s AYFKM? Award…

….goes to one BIG INVASION OF PRIVACY: The 2009 American Community Survey by the US Census.

The 2010 Census has not even started yet and we have an amazing amount of b*llsh*t happening surrounding the census what with our front doors be GPSed so that god-knows-who will know exactly where everybody is, to this next piece of insanity in the campaign against America.  Does anybody in the Beltway ever stop to think whether this is Constitutional, Morally Right, or just plain Bad Manners?  Nope.Did.Not.Think.So.  They’ve all been raised in a barn.

Big Brother asks: ‘Do you have a flush toilet?’
Mandatory Census survey inquires about citizens’ difficulty undressing, bathing.

The federal government is forcing 3 million Americans to disclose sensitive, information about finances, health and lifestyle in a 14-page survey – including questions about availability of household flush toilets and difficulty with undressing and bathing.

The 2009 American Community Survey, an annual supplement
to the decennial Census, asks about residents’ personal relationships and whether a home has hot and cold running water, a flush toilet, bathing facilities, and phone services. It also asks how many rooms are in a home and what vehicles are used at each household.

The new questionnaire asks respondents what they pay for electricity, gas, water and sewer every month and whether residents receive food stamps.

Question 16 asks, “About how much do you think this house and lot, apartment, or mobile home would sell for if it were for sale?”

Respondents are required to disclose costs associated with rent or mortgage, annual real estate taxes on and fire, hazard and flood insurance expenses.

For each person in the household, the questionnaire asks for citizenship status, education level, whether that person attends private or public schools. It also features questions about health coverage, hearing and vision impairment and physical, mental or emotional conditions.

It asks if residents “have difficulty dressing or bathing” or “doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor’s office or shopping” or whether they have difficulty making decisions. Respondents must indicate if they have served in the military, their current marital status and whether they have been married or given birth to children in the last 12 months. The Census Bureau claims its question is used as a “measure of fertility” and is used to “carry out various programs required by statute, including … conducting research for voluntary family planning programs.”

The letter asks where residents worked last week and whether they drove a car, rode a bus, subway railroad, ferryboat, taxicab or bicycle to get there. It then asks what time they left for work and how long their commute lasted.

Respondents are also required to disclose their place of employment, duties and income.

While many recipients may consider the questionnaire to be tedious and meddling, the Census Bureau warns that citizens are required by law to complete it and may be fined as much as $5,000 for willfully refusing. While an individual may feel uneasy about answering each question truthfully, the fine for filing false information can be as much as $500. (emphasis added)

The Census Bureau estimates that the form takes an average of 38 minutes for each household to complete.

While the U.S. Constitution allows Americans to be counted for purposes of taxation and political representation, Jim Harper, a privacy expert at the Cato Institute, told the New York Post the survey is “a classic example of mission creep over the decades – this constitutional need to literally count how many noses are in the United States has turned into a vast data-collection operation.” (emphasis added)

Rep. Ron Paul blasted the government for spending “hundreds of millions of dollars” on the survey and called the questionnaire “insulting” in his Texas Straight Talk column.

“The questions are both ludicrous and insulting,” he wrote. “The survey asks, for instance, how many bathrooms you have in your house, how many miles you drive to work, how many days you were sick last year, and whether you have trouble getting up stairs. It goes on and on, mixing inane questions with highly detailed inquiries about your financial affairs. One can only imagine the countless malevolent ways our federal bureaucrats could use this information. At the very least the survey will be used to dole out pork, which is reason enough to oppose it.”

Paul continued, “The founders never authorized the federal government to continuously survey the American people. More importantly, they never envisioned a nation where the people would roll over and submit to every government demand. The American Community Survey is patently offensive to all Americans who still embody that fundamental American virtue, namely a healthy mistrust of government. “

Bad Behavior has blocked 1889 access attempts in the last 7 days.

%d bloggers like this: