California To Release 27,000 Criminals This Year

Heads up for my readers in California, and for the rest of you out there that haven’t been paying attention.  Can’tcha just wait for this to start happening EVERYWHERE?

State budget deal reduces prison inmates by 27,000

Reporting from Sacramento — The state budget deal negotiated by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and legislative leaders would reduce the population of California prisons by nearly 27,000 inmates in the current fiscal year.

That would be done with a combination of new measures, including allowing some inmates to finish their sentences on home detention, creating new incentives for completion of rehabilitation programs and scaling back parole supervision for the least serious offenders.

The proposal, details of which were obtained by The Times, would save a total of $1.2 billion in the coming year.

It is unclear whether Republicans will vote for a budget plan that includes reduction of the state prison system, which now houses 170,000 inmates. Some GOP votes are needed to pass a budget in California.

If Republicans demur, the Democrats who dominate the Legislature could approve the prison proposal as separate legislation with a simple majority vote, which would not require GOP support.

The plan would grant authority to state corrections officials to allow any inmate with 12 months or less left to serve to complete his or her sentence on home detention, although state officials would not be required to do so. Prison officials could also put any inmate who is over 60 or medically incapacitated on home detention instead of in a prison cell.

The state would use electronic monitoring for inmates serving time at home, and officials estimate that about 6,300 could do time this way.

Go over, read the rest, and then contemplate your 2nd Amendment rights.

7 thoughts on “California To Release 27,000 Criminals This Year”

  1. It looks like the Govenator has had his bluff called. Will he really set the maggots of society free because they didn’t get their way? The prisons should be the last thing to be cut even after hacking the schools budjets. Maybe we should all get together and donate bus tickets to all of the extra prisoners to be released…a one way ticket to San Fransisco. An extra 27,000 transiets just might change their tune about cutting bugets to art galleries and such. A meth head teenager with a credit card is more responsible than the California legislature.

  2. I’ve never been to California and now I know I’ll never go there! These people care nothing for the constituents of teir state or the country, as far as that goes. Do they really think those people are going to be crime-free? Up goes crime in CA. The ons who are sick will still need medical help whether they are in prison or at home which is still going to cost money. They may not all have a home to go to or relatives who want them. Are they going to do what the state mental hospitals have done in my state and just put them out on the streets? So they will hve more homeless criminals. Nice going Arny!

  3. Contemplating my 2nd Amendment Rights here in Arizona… one guess as to which direction all of these “electronically monitored” former inmates will head towards. Thanks for the info – I’ll be on my guard. Is there any doubt left as to what happens when a gigantic government strangles the private sector economy ? Way to go California politicians !

  4. Of course my state chooses to cut one of the only legitimate functions of a proper government – the prison system. Of course my state would put prisoners out on the loose instead of cutting crackheads and illegal aliens from welfare roles. Of course my state is putting us all at risk – they are liberal socialist eltists, the worst in the country. That is before Prez BO was annointed….

  5. We lived in California for 30 years before we finally moved back to the state of my birth about 7 years ago. Forty years ago, there were certain places in California where it was not too bad to live. But we saw it decline over all those years.

    Politicians in Sacramento basically abdicated their legislative responsibility in favor of letting the state unions just run amok with the budget. The public often had to bypass government inaction via the ballot propositions. Taxation just became ridiculous, both for individuals and companies… hence the mass exodus from the state. What was amazing on property taxes was if wasn’t for Prop. 13, it would have been even worse.

    It finally got out of hand on all fronts for us, as we could not ever see retiring there… unless we wanted to live in a van down by the river.

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